Marbled Tea Eggs

Bri over at Figs with Bri kindly tested this recipe for me and blogged about it. Do check it out!

Tea eggs are a nutritious snack, can be served warm or cold and are pleasing to the eye for when guests pop by. By gently cracking the shells of cooked eggs and then simmering the eggs in an aromatic “tea,” the egg whites develop an attractive “crackle glaze” once peeled. The eggs themselves take on the delicate flavors of soy and star anise. Try them in a chef’s salad or even in an egg salad sandwich. Cook the eggs longer for a stronger flavor and deeper color. They can be refrigerated in a covered container for up to 4 days.

Time: 15 minutes (active) plus 2 hours (cooking)
Makes: 8 eggs

8 eggs
water
1/2 cup soy sauce
4 star anise
3 black tea bags, strings removed (English Breakfast, Assam or for a smokier flavor, Lapsang Souchong)

In a (3-quart) saucepan, place the eggs in a single layer. Cover with water and bring to a boil over medium heat. Once water boils, remove pan from heat, cover and let stand for 15 minutes. Drain off water, cover eggs completely with fresh cold water and let stand.

Once eggs are cool enough to handle, tap each one gently with the back of a teaspoon to make fine cracks on the surface of the shell. Try to keep shell intact. Set eggs aside in a bowl.

In the same saucepan, bring 3 cups fresh water to boil over high heat. Add remaining ingredients. Carefully lower eggs one by one into the “tea” and reduce heat to medium-low. If eggs are not completely submerged, add more water. Cover and simmer for 2 hours. Remove from heat and let eggs sit in tea liquid on the stove for 1 hour. Then transfer to refrigerator to steep for at least 2 more hours or overnight.

Drain and peel. Serve halved or quartered.

Eating Silver and Gold–Chinese New Year Dumplings

There is a popular Chinese saying: “There is nothing more delicious than jiaozi.” Such an accolade no doubt points to the popularity of the simple Chinese dumpling. (Chinese dumplings come in many shapes and sizes but the most common are jiaozi and guotieh. They’re essentially the same dumpling– the only difference is how they’re cooked. See headnote below.)

No one can trace the origins of the dumpling definitively but it’s been around for over 2,500 years. Its evolution may have started when people living in the vicinity of the Yellow River learned to grind wheat into flour, and it became even more widespread when an official decree during the Han Dynasty produced a food item filled with mutton, chilies and medicinal herbs to help the poor get through the cold winter. Today, Chinese dumplings all over the world seem to adhere to one common denominator–a soft, pillowy pouch filled with pork and cabbage.

Chinese dumplings are a must for Chinese (or Lunar) New Year. The Year of the Rat (starting February 7th) is almost upon us and Chinese households across the globe will be making dumplings on New Year’s eve. Like all the foods and dishes eaten during the New Year, dumplings are full of symbolism. Thanks to their resemblance to shoe-shaped gold or silver ingots, they are believed to bring fortune and good luck. SILVER + GOLD = MONEY = PROSPERITY = WEALTH.

In northern China, families usually chop the meat and prepare the filling themselves. This symbolizes the chopping out of bad luck. Dumplings have always been regarded as some of the best food one can eat, so enjoying it at the intersect between the old and new years brings the past to a close and ushers in good luck for the coming year.

Generally, the dumplings are prepared before midnight on the last day of the previous year, a tradition Ellen Chou remembers well. “On New Year’s eve, you have the big feast. Then the women in the family prepare dumplings for New Year’s day breakfast.”

Born in 1942 in China’s Hubei province, Ellen fled to Taiwan with her family when the communists took over in 1948.

As a young girl, Ellen didn’t learn to cook. “My mom never went to school and her dream for me was to have as much education as possible so she chased me out of the kitchen,” she explains. Since Ellen’s mother dominated her kitchen, Ellen learned to make dumplings in school. “It was the first thing we learned in home economics,” she says. “I went to an all-girls school and we’d clear the ping pong table and everyone stood around it making dumplings.”

Ellen was kind enough to share her recipe for guo tieh or pot stickers, just like how she made it way back when, giggling with her schoolmates around the ping-pong table in Taiwan.

Happy Year of the Rat, everyone!!

Ellen Chou’s Pot Stickers

Pot stickers are a favorite Northern Chinese snack, the Chinese version of fast food if you will. That being said, it’s considered peasant food, made with pork and cabbage, two cheap and ubiquitous ingredients. The dumpling can be steamed, boiled or pan-fried. When it is pan-fried, it is called guotieh, literally pot sticker, because the bottom sticks to the pan and forms a crispy crust. When it is steamed, boiled or served in soups, it’s called jiaozi.

Considering how readily available it is frozen or as take-out, why would one even attempt to make pot stickers at home, with dough made from scratch at that! Let me tell you: pot sticker skins really make the dumpling and nothing beats the texture of homemade skins. Store-bought skins, like fresh pasta sheets, are thin and flat. Pot sticker skins should have some heft to them and are thicker in the middle to endure the heat of cooking and protect the filling.

Time: 1 to 2 hours (depending how nimble your fingers are at making the pot stickers)
Makes: about 40

DOUGH:
2 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 to 1 cup lukewarm water

FILLING:
1 pound ground pork (2 cups)
2 cups finely chopped napa cabbage (half a medium cabbage)
1 stalk green onion, finely chopped
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger (about 1/2-inch)
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 teaspoons plus pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
1 teaspoon sesame oil
3 tablespoons vegetable oil

In a large mixing bowl, combine 2 cups flour with 3/4 cup water. Mix well with a wooden spoon until it starts to come together, adding more water if necessary. With your hands, form dough into a rough ball. You want the dough to be pliable but not stick to your fingers. Sprinkle a little more flour if dough is too wet. The dough won’t feel smooth at this point. Set the dough ball in a bowl, cover with a damp towel and let it rest while you make the filling.

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Place cabbage in a medium bowl and sprinkle 2 teaspoons salt. Mix well. Taking a handful of vegetables at a time, squeeze water out. Or wrap cabbage in batches in a cheesecloth or non-terry towel and wring dry.

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In a large bowl, combine pork, cabbage, green onions, ginger, soy sauce, salt, white pepper and sesame oil. Mix well with chopsticks or a set of clean hands. Set aside.

Make the wrappers. Knead dough for several minutes until it is smooth all over. Divide it into 4 balls. Knead each ball individually for about 30 seconds. Roll each portion into a log about 5-inches long and 1/2-inch in diameter. Pinch off 9 or 10 even walnut-sized pieces. Dust with flour as needed.

Roll each piece into a ball and flatten into a disc between your palms. Place flattened disc on a well-floured surface. Starting at the bottom edge of the disc, use a Chinese rolling pin* and roll from the outside of the circle in. Use your right hand to roll the pin as your left hand turns the disc anti-clockwise. So the sequence goes: roll, turn, roll, turn. Roll each disc into a circle about 3-inches in diameter. Don’t worry about making a perfect circle. Ideally, the wrapper will be thicker in the middle than on the edges.

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Spoon about 2 teaspoons of filling into the center of wrapper. Fold wrapper in half over filling to form a half-moon pocket and pinch shut**.

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Repeat until all the dough or filling is used up. Set pot sticker down firmly on a parchment-lined tray seam-side up so that dumpling sits flat.

Heat an (8- to 10-inch) non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Swirl 3 tablespoons vegetable oil into the bottom of pan to coat evenly. Place about a dozen dumplings in a single layer seam-side up in the skillet and brown for 1 minute.

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Add 1/2 to 3/4 cup water to the pan, depending on its size. Cover immediately and steam 9 to 10 minutes, until all the water evaporates. The bottom of the pot stickers should be golden brown and crisp but not burned. Remove pot stickers with a spatula and serve on a plate with bottom side up. Serve with dipping sauce (recipe below).

*Chinese rolling pins are skinnier and don’t have handles. They’re available in Asian markets, or get a 3/4-inch wooden dowel from a hardware store.

**The simplest way to seal the dumplings is to pinch the edges shut so that you have a flat seam. It will look like a turnover. If you are good at crimping, you can create a “pleated” edge. Pinch the middle of pocket to seal. Starting from the outer right edge of the back flap of wrapper, make 3 pleats facing the outer edge while working your way toward the middle. Repeat on the left and continue pressing edges together until entire curve is sealed.

Grandma says:
-To keep or make ahead, freeze pot stickers in a single layer on a tray until firm (about 15 minutes will do) so they don’t stick to each other when placed in a plastic bag. Freeze for up to a month. Do not defrost before cooking. Simply increase cooking time to 15 minutes.

-To reheat cooked pot stickers, swirl 1 tablespoon oil in the bottom of pan. Set pot stickers and pour in 2 tablespoons water, cover and steam until heated through.

-Since weather can affect how dough comes together, the ratio of flour to water  for the dough may not be 2 to 1 as suggested. Use your judgment to determine whether the mixture is too wet or dry and add flour or water as needed.

Soy-Ginger Dipping Sauce

Makes: 1/2 cup
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup rice vinegar
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped (about 1 tablespoon)
1 stalk green onion, finely chopped (about 1 tablespoon)
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger (about 3/4-inch)
1/4 teaspoon chili sauce, or to taste
1 clove garlic, smashed

Mix all ingredients in a small bowl. This will keep in a sealed container in the refrigerator for several days.

Tender Tails

The Wong’s Oxtail Stew

 

Yes, it’s true. Asians love to eat just about every part of the animal. But in cultures where meat is spendy and animals are a livelihood, you can’t blame them for not wanting to waste any animal part or by-product. And besides oxtail is such a tasty morsel too. It may be made up of mostly bone and cartilage, but when combined with an assortment of veggies in a soup or stew, it’s a super way to stretch a small amount of very tasty and tender (albeit after hours of cooking) meat. The bones and marrow also produce a very rich and flavorful stock, thanks to the collagen released during cooking which renders the liquid deliciously thick. Oxtail turns tender only after a long simmer on the stove so if you don’t really want to hang out in your kitchen for 4 hours, a crockpot or pressure cooker is your best friend.

Rachel Wong, who got this recipe from her mom, told me to add in “as much ginger as I can handle” so I threw in 2-inches worth. Add more (or less) if you’d like!

Time: 15 minutes (prep) plus 4 hours (cooking)
Makes: 4 to 6 servings

2-1/2 to 3 pounds oxtail, trimmed of fat and joints separated
2-inches fresh ginger, peeled and cut into matchsticks
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
2 tablespoons oyster sauce
2 tablespoons yellow bean sauce or paste
1 tablespoon sugar
1 to 2 tablespoons Shaoxing wine or dry sherry (optional)
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 green onions, finely chopped
3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

In a 4-quart pot or Dutch oven, bring 3 quarts of water to a boil. Throw in oxtail, and bring to a boil again.

Drain water to get rid of fat and return oxtails to pot. Fill pot with just enough water to cover oxtail. Add ginger, dark soy sauce, oyster sauce, bean paste, sugar, wine and pepper, and stir to mix. Cover and simmer over medium-low heat for 3-1/2 to 4 hours until meat is fall-off-the-bone tender.

Transfer to a serving plate and scatter green onions and cilantro all over. Serve with steamed rice or noodles.

Note: Yellow bean sauce, also known as brown bean sauce or broad bean sauce, is basically fermented soy beans (usually a by-product of the soy sauce-making process) mixed with salt and sometimes wheat flour. The mixture can be further mashed up to form a paste. Look for them in plastic bottles or glass jars at the Asian market.

Recording recipes … behind the scenes

When I first started working on my cookbook, I really didn’t know what to expect.

I was lucky enough to have a brief chat with Grace Young at the 2007 IACP conference in Chicago. The author of two family-based cookbooks, Grace gave me a behind-the-scenes overview of cooking with grandmas and aunties. Be prepared, was her number one advice.

And so I am.

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Some tools of the trade

Every time I pay a visit to someone’s kitchen, my bag is packed with the following arsenal:
-Measuring cups
-Measuring spoons
-Stopwatch
-Camera
-Notebook and pen
(I decided against a tape recorder though)

As you can imagine, it’s not easy juggling so much gear. I often feel like a character straight out of a Merry Melodies cartoon (though if I had to choose, I’d like to be the smart and feisty Road Runner … beep beep). Yes, it’s been comical–having to stop cooks at every step of the way to measure out the salt (2 teaspoons), the sesame oil (1 tablespoon), or the galangal (1-inch equals how many tablespoons minced??) And it’s not even funny anymore how many times I’ve had to fish packages out of the trash can to note down how many pounds of pork went into the soup.

Don’t forget that in between all this activity I’m taking photos (wait, hold that spatula in mid-air so I can capture your stir-fry motion!), and writing down notes (slice carrot on the diagonal not straight across), and timing (garlic is fragrant, add chicken to wok, start stopwatch now).

Everyone I’ve cooked with has been so very patient and they never fail to humor me. For this, I am very thankful.

Despite the flurry of activity that goes on when I’m out “in the field,” I feel that it’s actually the easiest and most accurate way to record recipes. And I get to taste the–always yummy–results immediately.

That being said, let’s turn to my other route for gathering recipes. Friends and strangers alike have been very generous in sending me their family recipes. Some have been easy-to-follow, requiring minimal tweaks here and there, yet others have been quite amusing. Take this list of ingredients my friend Luwei emailed me for her mom’s bakso goreng (crispy fried meatballs) recipe:

Bakso Goreng
==========

(Luwei’s comments are in parentheses)
Ingredients:
– 1kg minced pork
– 0.5kg minced prawn (you can halve the prawns and add 0.25kg fish as well, which is my mom’s friend’s recipe, but my mom sticks with prawn only)
– 2.5oz cornstarch (this is the iffy part–not sure how they figured that out since they don’t measure!)
– 8 eggs (another iffy part–seems like a lot of eggs to me, but my mom seems quite comfortable with that number)
– fish sauce
– salt
– sugar
– optional: green onion and rehydrated dried cuttlefish, diced (for crunch, but I don’t like it, and my mom doesn’t use it)

Recipes like these are priceless :).

No measurements, or iffy measurements–I don’t know which is better. But therein lies the beauty of homecooking: everything’s fluid, a dish is perfect when your taste buds say it is, and ingredients vary according to what’s available in the fridge.

And of course, it’s my job to translate and test recipes to make it easy for even the most novice of cooks to follow. All it takes is patience, patience to add the salt teaspoon by teaspoon, or water 1/4 cup at a time, tasting every step of the way; and a keen eye for observation–hmm … does the mixture look too dry or too mushy?

Et voila, here it is, the bakso goreng recipe after a makeover.

Bakso Goreng or Crispy Fried Meatballs

Bakso goreng is originally a Chinese dish and was modified by Hakka immigrants to Indonesia. Halal versions use chicken or beef instead of pork. Instead of shrimp, try substituting with fish paste. The same mixture can also be used to stuff peppers, eggplant, or tofu, which can then be either steamed or fried. This variant is called Yong Tau Foo in Singapore and Malaysia. Bakso goreng is delicious eaten with rice and a side dish of vegetables for a meal, or as party poppers (appetizers you can easily pop in your mouth 🙂).


Time: 45 minutes
Makes: about 35 meatballs

2 pounds minced pork
1 pound shrimp, peeled and minced
2 eggs
1/4 cup cornstarch
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon white pepper
1/2 cup green onions cut into thin ‘O’s (about 2 stalks)
2 cups canola oil

In a large bowl, gently mix all ingredients together using your hands. The resulting mixture will be moist and lumps well into balls.

In a 14-inch wok or skillet, heat oil over high heat until it registers 350F on a thermometer. Fry a small piece of pork mixture and taste to make sure it’s salty enough.

Shape pork mixture into golf balls (about one-inch in diameter). Grab a handful of the mixture and squeeze it out of the hole at the top of your fist. Scoop each meatball with an oiled tablespoon and drop it carefully into the oil. Make 6 to 8 meatballs per batch; do not crowd the wok. Deep-fry meatballs until golden brown and crispy, about 4 to 5 minutes.

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Lift meatballs from oil using a slotted spoon or wire mesh strainer, and drain on paper towels. Remove any debris from oil and continue frying meatballs in batches until done.

Serve with chili sauce and/or rice. 

Cold Cucumber Salad

Cold cucumber salad, or liang ban huang gua in Mandarin, makes for a delightful plate of pickles to start off any meal. My friend Lynn Chang’s mother, Li, says her family’s original recipe used ginger sugar syrup but because it’s not readily available, maple syrup is the next best thing. The diagonal cuts in the cucumber allow the vegetable to absorb more flavor from the brine but you may skip this step if in a rush. For additional color and flavor, you can also add diced red bell pepper. The pickles will keep for up to 1 week in the refrigerator. Once the veggies are gone,  re-use the brine for another batch.

Time: 20 minutes (active), 2 hours 30 minutes (total)
Makes: 4 to 6 servings

2 large cucumbers
1 small carrot
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup distilled white vinegar
1/2 cup water
3 tablespoons pure maple syrup
2 tablespoons sugar
1 thin slice fresh ginger root (optional)
Pinch of cayenne pepper (optional)

Using a vegetable peeler or sharp paring knife, peel cucumbers, leaving alternate strips of green. Cut each cucumber lengthwise into four spears and remove seeds using a teaspoon.

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Lay each spear skin-side up on a chopping board and make diagonal cuts (no more than halfway across the width) into the edge closest to you from top to bottom. Repeat with remaining spears. Cut cucumber into 1/2-inch slices.

Peel and cut carrot into coins 1/4-inch thick.   

Place cucumber and carrot into a colander and sprinkle salt all over. Let stand for 1/2 hour.

To make brine, in a small bowl, combine remaining ingredients and microwave on medium-high for 1 minute. Stir brine, making sure all the sugar has dissolved, and taste.

Rinse vegetables and drain off excess liquid. Place in a bowl and pour cooled brine over. Cover and refrigerate at least 2 hours or overnight. Drain and serve.

1-2-3-4-5 Sticky Spareribs

This recipe is a hybrid of two recipes given to me by Jonathan H. Liu and my friend Ivy Chan. Jonathan, an American-born Chinese, has been learning how to cook from his mom so that he can make the dishes he grew up with. He now has a good repertoire of simple, reliable stand-bys. He declares this dish has “one of the best ease-of-preparation to tastiness ratios.”

1-2-3-4-5 Sticky Spareribs

If you’ve ever thought that Chinese recipes were complicated, this dish dispels all preconceptions. Not only is it easy to remember, it’s almost effortless to prepare. To feed more people, just increase the ratios in proportion to the meat. For a tangier taste, switch the proportions of vinegar and sugar. Try it with beef short ribs too.

Time: 45 minutes
Makes: 4 to 6 servings

2 pounds pork ribs (spare ribs or country-style, cut into chunks)
1 tablespoon alcohol (Chinese Shaoxing wine or sherry)
2 tablespoons vinegar
3 tablespoons sugar
4 tablespoons soy sauce
5 tablespoons water

In a large wide-mouthed heavy-bottomed pot or Dutch oven, combine the rice wine, vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, and water. Add the spareribs and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer for 40 to 45 minutes uncovered, stirring occasionally.

If the meat dries out and starts to burn, add water, 1 tablespoon at a time. The ribs are ready when the meat is tender and glossed with a sticky, reddish-brown glaze and the liquid has been absorbed. Serve with freshly steamed rice and a vegetable side dish.

**Addendum:

If there’s still a lot of liquid at the end of the cooking time (this can happen if the meat contains a lot of water), remove the meat and raise the heat to high. Cook until the liquid turns into a thick, sticky sauce. Add the ribs back into the pot and toss to coat. You can also broil the ribs on high for 3 to 4 minutes to create a nice burnished crust while you reduce the sauce..

In memory of a chef-dad, plus his from-scratch black bean sauce

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Cathy Chun stir-frying vegetables to use with her dad’s black bean sauce recipe

Not everyone grew up on the tasty goodness of mom’s or grandma’s cooking.

Cathy Chun is a valid case in point. Her late father, David Chun, reined in the kitchen. And everyone, including Cathy’s mom, was happy with that arrangement.

Ironic as it was, Cathy’s dad was the first son in his family. The antithesis to the stereotypical, pampered, first-born son (FBS) in a Chinese family (more often than not, a FBS is showered with attention, isn’t expected to lift a finger, and lo and behold if he steps into the kitchen!), David spent a lot of time in the kitchen as a boy and learned to cook.

Cathy and her siblings were the happy beneficiaries of their dad’s talents in the kitchen. Food was the medium he used to show his love, she explained. “He was not expressive emotionally but he made sure we ate good food.”

On a surprisingly sunny day in autumnal Seattle, I was cooking at Cathy’s house with her sister Carol who was visiting from Hawaii. Cathy wanted to show me how to make her dad’s black bean sauce–from scratch!–and a couple of other dishes from their family cookbooks.

Yes, they had not one, but three, family cookbooks! In 1988, Cathy’s family published a family cookbook entitled Potluck at Popo’s followed by the sequels Just One More in 1989 and Once Again at Popo’s in 2002. When Cathy was growing up in Hawaii, her grandmother, whom she called Popo, hosted numerous potluck parties to celebrate birthdays and other special occasions. Relatives stretching across five generations would gather at Popo’s house, each family bringing a favorite dish. Eventually, they decided to compile these dishes into several cookbook volumes for posterity.

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As we chopped asparagus and peeled shrimp, Cathy and Carol bantered and reminisced about their dad and their childhood.

Turns out that not only was their dad a superb cook, he was a meticulous one too.

Carol remembered how, wielding a pair of tweezers, he would pick the tiny hairs off pork destined for the pot, and pull the pin feathers off the chickens he was about to cook. And he could always be found on Thanksgiving morning cutting bread into cubes to roast in the oven for croutons and stuffing. Boxed versions never passed muster.

The conversation meandered organically: we discussed all the different things you could do with spam and Vienna sausages–staples in Hawaii, of course–and whether rice is better cooked on the stove or in the rice cooker. Cathy explained it simply. “I grew up on rice made in a pot.” And that’s how she’s always liked it.

In the end, it all boils down to what you’re used to. Yet another quirk–Cathy’s dad never used a wok and “his cast iron skillet was always on the stove,” she recalled. This might explain why her favorite kitchen accoutrement is the skillet.

Through osmosis, Cathy incorporated many of her dad’s tips and tricks into her culinary repertoire. And the ever-sentimental daughter still keeps his sharpening stone on her kitchen counter as a reminder of the loving father who nourished her both physically and emotionally.

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Here are some tips and tricks Cathy’s dad used in the kitchen. Perhaps you’d find them useful too!

  • Cathy’s dad taught her never to add oil to a cold pan. So when’s the right time to add it? I watched as Cathy held her hand over the pan on the heated stove to “feel” if it was hot enough. She couldn’t really explain it but she said with experience, you’ll just know. “There’s a connection between knowing the heat level and what it does.”
  • He always hand chopped ingredients. He believed a food processor mashed up food and ruined its texture.
  • When making kao yuk (another term for soy sauce pork), Cathy’s dad would fry the pork belly first. Then he’d place it in the sink, pierce the fat and run cold water over it to allow the fat to rise to the top. This removed some of the “fattiness” of the pork.
  • The secret to great tasting chow fun (fried rice noodles) is to season the rice noodles with oyster sauce and let it sit first before throwing in the rest of ingredients.
  • Cathy’s dad always cooked with bacon grease. Does it make food tastier? You be the judge!

Shrimp with Black Bean Sauce

Bottled black bean sauce is ubiquitous in the aisles of any Asian grocery store. But as the saying goes, from-scratch really does taste better and you can control the amount of sodium that goes into the sauce. Keep in mind that fermented black beans are coated with salt so feel free to adjust the amount of sodium-containing ingredients (i.e. soy sauce, store-bought stock, etc.). Try the basic sauce with chicken or pork too, and mix and match the vegetables.

Time: 20 minutes
Serves: 4 to 6

Combine the following in a small bowl for the basic black bean sauce mixture:
2 tablespoons fermented black beans, rinsed and mashed
2 cloves of garlic, minced
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon sugar
2 teaspoons cornstarch
2/3 cup chicken stock

2 green and/or red bell peppers, seeded and cut into 1-inch squares
12-14 stalks asparagus, cut into 1-inch lengths (about half a bundle)
1-1/2 pounds shrimp, shelled and deveined
2 tablespoons canola oil (or bacon grease if you dare!), divided

In a work or large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon oil until very hot (test with a few sprinkles of water, if it sizzles, it’s ready). Stir-fry veggies over medium-high heat for about 2 minutes and remove from pan.

In the same skillet, add remaining oil and heat until very hot. Add shrimp and cook until they just turn pink, about 1 minute. Add black bean sauce and stir to coat shrimp. Add veggies and mix well. Add 2 tablespoons water and stir-fry with a couple more flourishes.

Take off the stove and serve with steamed rice.